[1] of the return artifact to be

1 Staring, Nico, Revisiting
Three Objects in Berlin Pertaining to the Mayor of Memphis, Ptahmose: The
“Lost” Faience Stela ÄM 19718 and the Limestone Pyramid Panels ÄM
1631-1632. Studien zur Altägyptischen Kultur 45, 2016,
p.

2 Staring, Nico, Revisiting
Three Objects in Berlin Pertaining to the Mayor of Memphis, Ptahmose: The
“Lost” Faience Stela ÄM 19718 and the Limestone Pyramid Panels ÄM
1631-1632. Studien zur Altägyptischen Kultur 45, 2016,
p.

We Will Write a Custom Essay Specifically
For You For Only $13.90/page!


order now

3 https://www.livescience.com/59333-lost-wwii-egyptian-artifact-returns-to-germany.html

Eventually, The Kelsey
Museum decided to return the object back to Berlin again after absence of
approximately 78 years. On April 26th, 2017, Kelsey Museum Collections Manager
Sebastián Encina handed over the artifact to the director of Berlin Egyptian
Museum Dr. Frederike Seyfried in New York. In a similar step of appreciation,
the German side reciprocated by offering creating a replica of the return
artifact to be displayed in Ann Arbor instead of the deaccessioned one.3

In 2016, the Dutch Egyptologist,
Nico Staring, currently a visiting scholar at Leiden University, notice during
his recent research the resemblance of the faience stele at the Kelsey Museum
of Archaeology to another object have been missing from the Berlin Egyptian
Museum since the destruction of the Second World War. Staring informed both
institutions, the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology and Berlin Museum, of his
discovery. Consequently, the curators of The Kelsey Museum of Archaeology,
Terry Wilfong and Janet Richards, with Staring’s assistance started their
investigation in this regard. Ultimately, they proved the veracity of
information introduced by Staring. The Kelsey artifact was actually the same
Berlin stela which acquired in 1910 and remained a part of Egyptian collection
in Berlin Museum until its last presence in the beginning of The Second World
War before it had been considered lost. The interpretation assumed by the
curators is that the stela apparently looted from the destructed museum or
have been lost in the bombing of
the museum before it was sold later to S.
A. Goudsmit in 1945.

In 1945, The
stela appeared once again in a private collection of Dutch-American Physicist
and art collector, Samuel Abraham Goudsmit (1902–1978). S. A. Goudsmit
purchased it from a German private owner during his visit to Germany as a
scientific head of a secret U.S. Army mission monitoring Nazi Germany’s efforts
to build a nuclear bomb after the Second World War. There is no any further
information in the records about the vendor, nor is there any details of how
the object reached to the German collector. Later, S. A. Goudsmit decided to bequeath
the bulk of his Egyptian private collection to the University of Michigan’s
Kelsey Museum of Archaeology. The collection was handed over to the museum in
1981 by his widow, Mrs. Irene B. Goudsmit and the stela was given an
accessioned under (Inventory No. 1981.4.4). 2

The faience stela fragment was a part of
a collection of 65 objects were acquired by The Department of Egyptian
Antiquities, National Museums of Berlin by purchase from Mrs. Lina Olympia
Leitner (1848–1912) on behalf of the Leitner Museum in Woking in the United
Kingdom, founded by her husband Mr. Gottlieb Wilhelm Leitner (1840–1899). Since
then, the Stela was housed in the Neues Museum until the outset of the second
World War in 1939 when the museum had to shut its doors and thereafter move the
large portion of the collection to other locations for safekeeping. On the
other hand, the rest of the collection, which remained in the museum were
destroyed or damaged due of the bombings during the world war. 1

One of the registral
challenges offered by the Egyptian collection at The University of Michigan’s Kelsey Museum of Archaeology is the repatriation archaeological
objects issue. This issue represents in removing the objects improperly
from their countries of origin. In this context, the Kelsey
Museum of Archaeology in Ann Arbor, recently identified an object, a
faience stela fragment Ptahmose (Inventory
No. 1981.4.4), among its Egyptian collection was
looted during the Second World War.

Repatriation Culture Proprieties
Issue: